October12014
“Let children read whatever they want and then talk about it with them. If parents and kids can talk together, we won’t have as much censorship because we won’t have as much fear.”

Judy Blume (via thelifeguardlibrarian)

Saw this on my dash just as I finished formatting a teacher’s companion for this year’s CBLDF Liberty Annual and, yeah, I agree with this.

(via bigredrobot)

PREACH it, Judy.

(via mdt)

(via honeybeerevengeparty)

September302014
thenearsightedmonkey:

Little comics everywhere

thenearsightedmonkey:

Little comics everywhere

(Source: arcaneimages)

8PM
A thing. I love the idea, just trying to play with it. #writing

A thing. I love the idea, just trying to play with it. #writing

7PM
alexsegura:

Eartha Kitt by Ernst Haas, 1952. 

alexsegura:

Eartha Kitt by Ernst Haas, 1952. 

(Source: theimpossiblecool)

4PM

cbldf:

Watch Last Week’s Copyright vs. Creativity Panel at NYU Law!

During CBLDF’s event-filled Banned Books Week, Executive Director Charles Brownstein joined a panel last Tuesday at the NYU School of Law entitled “Copyright vs. Creativity: Is Intellectual Property Reserved for the 1%?” Along with Ricky Rouse Has a Gun author Jörg Tittel and NYU Law professors Christopher Sprigman and Barton Beebe, Brownstein discussed whether copyright has lost one of its principle functions: to protect authors and original ideas.

2PM

(Source: hurwitzs, via phoning-it-in)

2PM
“Newly released documents prove the U.S. National Security Agency’s spying power overseas primarily comes from a 33-year-old executive order signed by then President Ronald Reagan.
The American Civil Liberties Union obtained a series of internal papers from intelligence agencies including the NSA and Defense Intelligence Agency detailing how integral Reagan’s 1981 order is to the NSA’s current surveillance program. The order broadly allows the government to collect data from any company that is believed to have ties to foreign organizations. It also complicates the path forward for intelligence reforms in Congress.
Previous reports acknowledge the order’s use as a foundation for some of the NSA’s surveillance programs such as gaining backdoor access to tech companies’ data centers. But the new documents, which were released as part of a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit the ACLU and other civil liberties advocates filed just before Edward Snowden’s leaks to the media, show Executive Order 12333 is the “primary source” authority when it comes to the NSA’s foreign spy programs.” The ‘Primary Source’ Of NSA’s Spying Power Is A 33-Year-Old Executive Order By Ronald Reagan | ThinkProgress (via alexsegura)

(via alexsegura)

1PM
Watch The Skies

Watch The Skies

(Source: qqmoarz, via miviso)

7AM
OK that looks cool. #ny #queens #commute

OK that looks cool. #ny #queens #commute

6AM
Morning….

Morning….

5AM
samuraitears:

Chill of death beckons   Honor and Respect we meet   We are kindred Souls

samuraitears:

Chill of death beckons   Honor and Respect we meet   We are kindred Souls

(via demonweasel)

5AM

juvenilecinephile:

it-used-to-be-fun:

Abbi and Ilana are the idols of a largely underserved and under-chronicled female id.”
"Men have managed to get away with prolonged adolescence, on the screen and in life, in a way that women haven’t. “Women always have to be the eye rollers, as the men make a mess,” Poehler said. “We didn’t want that. Young women can be lost, too.”
— Id Girls - the comedy couple behind “Broad City.” (Nick Paumgarten for the new yorker)

This was really good

(via essentiallydazzling)

September292014
7PM
lakidaa:

baroncaveyeti:

snarkbender:

jamsradio:

 

anyone know what this is from?

"Judgement Day" by EC Comics. From wikipedia:

The story depicted a human astronaut, a representative of the Galactic Republic, visiting the planet Cybrinia inhabited by robots. He finds the robots divided into functionally identical orange and blue races, one of which has fewer rights and privileges than the other. The astronaut decides that due to the robots’ bigotry, the Galactic Republic should not admit the planet. In the final panel, he removes his helmet, revealing himself to be a black man.

Apparently the Comics Code Authority tried to prevent the author from making the main character black.

Boy did they! It took the writer (and the company) threatening the CCA with a lawsuit and telling the guy to fuck off (literally) to get this thing printed: 
Comic Historian Digby Diehl recounted in Tales from the Crypt: The Official Archives:

This really made ‘em go bananas in the Code czar’s office. ‘Judge Murphy was off his nut. He was really out to get us’, recalls [EC editor] Feldstein. ‘I went in there with this story and Murphy says, “It can’t be a Black man”. But … but that’s the whole point of the story!’ Feldstein sputtered. When Murphy continued to insist that the Black man had to go, Feldstein put it on the line. ‘Listen’, he told Murphy, ‘you’ve been riding us and making it impossible to put out anything at all because you guys just want us out of business’. [Feldstein] reported the results of his audience with the czar to Gaines, who was furious [and] immediately picked up the phone and called Murphy. ‘This is ridiculous!’ he bellowed. ‘I’m going to call a press conference on this. You have no grounds, no basis, to do this. I’ll sue you’. Murphy made what he surely thought was a gracious concession. ‘All right. Just take off the beads of sweat’. At that, Gaines and Feldstein both went ballistic. ‘Fuck you!’ they shouted into the telephone in unison. Murphy hung up on them, but the story ran in its original form.[18]

lakidaa:

baroncaveyeti:

snarkbender:

jamsradio:

 

anyone know what this is from?

"Judgement Day" by EC Comics. From wikipedia:

The story depicted a human astronaut, a representative of the Galactic Republic, visiting the planet Cybrinia inhabited by robots. He finds the robots divided into functionally identical orange and blue races, one of which has fewer rights and privileges than the other. The astronaut decides that due to the robots’ bigotry, the Galactic Republic should not admit the planet. In the final panel, he removes his helmet, revealing himself to be a black man.

Apparently the Comics Code Authority tried to prevent the author from making the main character black.

Boy did they! It took the writer (and the company) threatening the CCA with a lawsuit and telling the guy to fuck off (literally) to get this thing printed: 

Comic Historian Digby Diehl recounted in Tales from the Crypt: The Official Archives:

This really made ‘em go bananas in the Code czar’s office. ‘Judge Murphy was off his nut. He was really out to get us’, recalls [EC editor] Feldstein. ‘I went in there with this story and Murphy says, “It can’t be a Black man”. But … but that’s the whole point of the story!’ Feldstein sputtered. When Murphy continued to insist that the Black man had to go, Feldstein put it on the line. ‘Listen’, he told Murphy, ‘you’ve been riding us and making it impossible to put out anything at all because you guys just want us out of business’. [Feldstein] reported the results of his audience with the czar to Gaines, who was furious [and] immediately picked up the phone and called Murphy. ‘This is ridiculous!’ he bellowed. ‘I’m going to call a press conference on this. You have no grounds, no basis, to do this. I’ll sue you’. Murphy made what he surely thought was a gracious concession. ‘All right. Just take off the beads of sweat’. At that, Gaines and Feldstein both went ballistic. ‘Fuck you!’ they shouted into the telephone in unison. Murphy hung up on them, but the story ran in its original form.[18]

(via honeybeerevengeparty)

7AM
creaturemadeofsunshine:

Folk punk in a nutshell.

creaturemadeofsunshine:

Folk punk in a nutshell.

(via falconx7)

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